Saturday, 8 August 2020

Operations and International Law Articles

  • JAG in the Arena: The Ethical Challenges of the Operational Lawyer

  • Playing the MIDFIELD: It’s High Time to Recognize Law as an Instrument of National Power

  • Administrative Investigations and Non-judicial Punishment in Joint Environments

  • Autonomous Weapons Need Autonomous Lawyers

  • W. Hays Parks and the Law of War

Operational and International Law icon Operations and International Law – Operations and International law capabilities enhance command situational awareness, maximize decision space, and promote optimal conditions for the projection of ready forces to defend the Nation and our allies

 

W. Hays Parks and the Law of War

DoD Photo (Archive): W. Hays Parks discusses issues related to the Geneva Convention with reporters at the Pentagon on April 7, 2003.

By Maj R. Scott Adams. W. Hays Parks’ work deserves serious study by judge advocates today. His work provides insight, both as a challenge to modern-day thinking, and as a plethora of practical guides to important areas of international humanitarian law.

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THE JAG IN THE ARENA

AC-130U "Spooky" Gunship

By Lt Col Jason DeSon. Many military lawyers might believe they are only in the arena when they are in the courtroom. Nothing can be further from the truth—especially for the operational lawyer.

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Playing the MIDFIELD

Individual pointing to screen graphics and highlighting LAW. Graphic illustration. Photo background © iStock.com/alexsl

By Col Jeremy Weber. Law plays a central role in national power, and pretty much every other area of life. It is time we recognize a legal instrument of power to better incorporate the legal domain into our strategic planning.

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Autonomous Weapons Need Autonomous Lawyers

Concept illustration of a robot holding legal scales

By Col Walter “Frank” Coppersmith. Timely adoption of AI inside today’s U.S. Air Force legal practice will be essential for attorneys trying to keep pace with clients and organizations now operating at Internet speed and cloud computing scale.

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Anticipatory Self-Defense

By Maj Megan Mallone and Capt Christine Seibert. Anticipatory self-defense has been recognized by the international community after it was first articulated in 1837 in the Caroline case. There are two types of anticipatory attacks in self-defense: pre-emptive and preventive. The distinction is nuanced and often misunderstood...

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